Nature’s Terrifying Night Light

The Vampire Squid has big shoes to fill with its intimidating name. This “scary” critter is all bark and no bite. Measuring in at a mere 6 inches in length, this spiny fella can appear to be the Dracula of the deep sea. Starting with its head, you will see two “wings” that flap up and down to propel the squid through the water (at a leisurely pace). If the squid is in more of a hurry, it can use the jet propulsion of water through its mantle as a means of acceleration as other squids do. They may be tiny, but they are fast little suckers. Vampire squids can move at speeds upwards of two body lengths per second.

Moving down from its head-flaps, the eyes of the Vampire Squid can be as big as those of a large dog. Imagine if your eyes took up most of your face. And were red or blue depending on the light. You would probably look like you walked straight out of an anime illustration. Although they can move two body lengths per second, that sill don’t get far enough fast enough when speedy predators are on the hunt. When threatened, they pull their legs (with connecting webbing) up over their heads exposing their suction cups and rows of fleshy spines as an attempt at intimidating larger predators.

Due to their love for the deep sea, they are equipped with photophores that give them the ability to carry out the bioluminescence chemical process. In other words, they can literally turn themselves on and off, just like a nightlight. A nightlight with big red eyes and rows of spikes under its cape. Maybe not the best choice for a child who is afraid of the dark.

Share Button